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astrophotography Tag

Do you want to learn how to edit the Milly Way in your photos so it really pops? Good! Because this is exactly the content of the video I just published on YouTube! I went with my friend Robert to Stonehenge, UK, for a night out hoping to get some good shots of Comet Neowise again and also the Milky Way and all we could squeeze in one night. My

A once in a lifetime opportunity, that's what photographing Comet Neowise over London (or anywhere else, really) is! I'm not going to dive in too many descriptions of the event. I'm sure you all know about it by now and I'm not an astronomy guru.What makes this a once in a lifetime event is that the comet was only discovered last March and it won't be visible again for another

The Astronomy Calendar 2020 makes a lot of sense in this blog. You might remember from previous posts or Instagram Stories that I'm a bit obsessed with Sun and Moon. In fact, I already talked about my hunt for a Supermoon (and eclipse) here and here. When it comes to sunrise and sunset, there's a bit of luck involved because you can hardly know if the colours in the sky

The Super Wolf Blood Moon in January was only half a success because the clouds arrived to "eclipse the eclipse". That meant I needed to try this again with the new supermoon in February, the Super Snow Moon. What is a supermoon anyway? Obviously, you know that the moon follows an elliptical orbit around the Earth. Within this trajectory, the perigee is the closest point to our planet and the apogee is

We were still in the first weeks of the new year, and yet there was already an exciting photographic occasion: the super blood wolf moon. Such dramatic name stands for a supermoon that happens at the same time of a lunar eclipse. Something that's really rare: consider the next eclipse will be only visible in UK in almost 11 years! If you're about to google the date to pin it